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Maximizing Leader Performance in the Context of Workplace Stress: Modeling the Influence of Expertise and Problem Solving

Ristow, Teresa and Caughron, Jay (2018) Maximizing Leader Performance in the Context of Workplace Stress: Modeling the Influence of Expertise and Problem Solving. Masters thesis, Radford University.

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Abstract

This paper presents a model of moderated mediation for the relationship between stress and project outcomes of leaders. Based on theories in industrial/organizational psychology on leader problem solving and leadership expertise, stress was hypothesized to negatively influence project outcomes through the leaders’ problem-solving abilities. The mediation model of stress-problem solving-project outcomes was proposed to be conditional on the leadership expertise of the leader, such that the relationship between stress and problem solving would be strongest for leaders with more expertise at being in a position of leadership. Thus, the proposed moderated-mediation model for stress experienced by a leader was tested utilizing a sample of 103 individuals recruited via snowball sampling and sent a Qualtrics survey online. The participants were promoted to remember a time they were a leader in a team project and created a team project outcome. The current study will strictly focus on the individual level of analysis, however. Results were inconsistent with the hypothesized model, in that leadership expertise did not moderate the relationship between stress and problem solving. Additionally, problem solving did not mediate the stress-project outcomes relationship. Furthermore, the negative relationship between stress and project outcomes relationship was not found in the current study. Therefore, the current findings suggest that there are no individual differences in the stress experienced by leaders and their problem-solving abilities between highly experienced leaders and minimally experienced leaders working under conditions of varying levels of stress. However, additional findings, limitations of the study, and future research directions are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: UNSPECIFIED
Depositing User: Teresa Ristow
Date Deposited: 31 May 2019 16:14
Last Modified: 31 May 2019 16:14
URI: http://wagner.radford.edu/id/eprint/482

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