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EXOGENOUS CORTICOSTERONE ADMINISTRATION VS. AN ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSOR: APPROACH BEHAVIORS IN PASSER DOMESTICUS

Bjornson, Kirsten L (2014) EXOGENOUS CORTICOSTERONE ADMINISTRATION VS. AN ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSOR: APPROACH BEHAVIORS IN PASSER DOMESTICUS. Masters thesis, Radford University.

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Abstract

Stress responses to an immediate threat are thought to be beneficial for survival. The stress hormone, corticosterone (CORT), mediates bodily functions to better cope with a stressor. However, the behavioral effects of CORT are somewhat poorly understood. Previous studies have observed body condition and behavioral effects with repeated acute CORT administration over a long period of time. Moreover, Cooper and Davis (submitted) found that house sparrows (Passer domesticus) exhibited neophobic behaviors when exposed to the color red. In this thesis project, I plan to present house sparrows with a red stimulus directly after a single acute treatment of CORT with the expectation that CORT-treated birds will display more hesitant and anxious behaviors than those without CORT treatment. Additionally, few studies have compared whether exogenous CORT administration alone produces the same behavioral responses as a physical stressor. To investigate this, I will compare the CORT-treated and CORT-absent birds to those birds in a “capture and restraint” group. I expect there to be no behavioral differences between CORT-treated and “bagged” birds, while there will be behavioral differences between CORT-absent birds and “bagged” birds. The results from this study will further our knowledge of how corticosterone influences the stress response.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: UNSPECIFIED
Depositing User: Kirsten L. Bjornson
Date Deposited: 04 Dec 2014 14:55
Last Modified: 04 Dec 2014 14:55
URI: http://wagner.radford.edu/id/eprint/156

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