McConnell Library Scholars Repository

Understanding Metaregulatory Success: Associations with Habit and Vigilant Monitoring

Dillard, Krystina (2012) Understanding Metaregulatory Success: Associations with Habit and Vigilant Monitoring. Masters thesis, Radford University.

[img] Microsoft Word - Submitted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (272Kb)
[img]
Preview
PDF - Submitted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (378Kb) | Preview

Abstract

Self-regulation refers to how individuals manage the conflicting decision-making process between temptations and long-term goal adherence. Those who regularly resist temptations tend to accomplish long-term goals, making successful self-regulation necessary for life-long success. Research suggests that some people implement metaregulatory strategies, or strategies that increase the likelihood of successful self-regulation. One of the most powerful metaregulatory strategies is healthy habit formation. High metaregulators, or people who regularly implement metaregulatory strategies, likely develop healthy habits and thus were expected to be better at inhibiting unwanted habits. The current research investigated individual differences in metaregulation during a habit inhibition task. Overall, metaregulation did not predict the ability to inhibit habits. However, gender was found to be a moderating variable and a better conceptualization of metaregulation was obtained.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: UNSPECIFIED
Depositing User: Krystina Dillard
Date Deposited: 21 May 2013 18:45
Last Modified: 21 May 2013 18:45
URI: http://wagner.radford.edu/id/eprint/80

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item