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Policing in Socially Disorganized Communities: The Implementation of Community Policing, Crime Analysis, and Policing Technologies

Berry, Philip (2019) Policing in Socially Disorganized Communities: The Implementation of Community Policing, Crime Analysis, and Policing Technologies. Masters thesis, Radford University.

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Abstract

Abstract The last century has seen a revolution of policing practices across the United States, especially regarding community policing practices, crime analysis, and the utilization of modern technologies. These practices have been implemented across the country in order to improve relationships between the community and their police departments, provide police supervisors with targeted approaches to crime reduction, as well as modernize policing tactics. Each of these aforementioned practices has been proven to have a positive aspect for police departments; however, there has been a lack of research conducted attempting to tie these practices to the theoretical framework of Social Disorganization Theory. This study uses UCR, LEMAS, and Census data in order to evaluate whether or not there are any relationships between social disorganization levels within a community and its police department’s use of community policing practices, crime analysis, and modern technologies. Backwards Stepwise Regression techniques were utilized for the main statistical analysis. Findings indicate that social disorganization levels play a small role in the predictive nature of a department’s use of modern technology, and this finding only indicates a weak relationship. Overall, the findings of this study indicate that police departments fail to implement these policing practices in areas that are socially disorganized; however, tailoring these practices towards these areas of high social disorganization will exacerbate their effects in improving relationships and combatting crime rates.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: UNSPECIFIED
Depositing User: Philip Thomas Berry
Date Deposited: 02 Mar 2020 20:10
Last Modified: 02 Mar 2020 20:10
URI: http://wagner.radford.edu/id/eprint/517

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